Description

The presence of entanglement in physical systems affects dramatically their mechanical properties and their function. It is therefore of great interest to quantify entanglement complexity in these contexts.  However, knots and links in these systems do not always satisfy the strict mathematical definitions of knottedness, giving rise to a new area of study called Applied Knot Theory, that bridges pure and applied mathematics. In this virtual Workshop we bring together pure and applied mathematicians as well as engineers and biologists, to discuss the advances in the topology of materials.

Organizers

Eleni Panagiotou

Department of Mathematics and SimCenter

University of Tennessee Chattanooga

Email:

eleni-panagiotou@utc.edu 

Jason Cantarella

Department of Mathematics

University of Georgia

Eric Rawdon

Department of Mathematics

University of St Thomas

Presenters

Chris Soteros

Department of Mathematics and Statistics

University of Saskatchewan

Kumar Rajeev

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences

Oak Ridge National Laboratories

Sofia Lambropoulou

School of Applied Mathematical

 and Physical Sciences

National Technical University of Athens

Eleni Panagiotou

Department of Mathematics and SimCenter

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Dawn Ray

Department of Mathematics University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Quenisha Baldwin

Department of Biology

Tuskegee University

Program

1. Chris Soteros, (Characterizing the entanglements in lattice models of ring polymers in nanochannels)

    Recording: 

2. Kumar Rajeev, (Topological effects in polymers)

    Recording:

3. Dawn Ray, (The number of oriented rational links with given deficiency number)

    Recording:

4. Sofia Lambropoulou, (Finite type invariants for knotoids)

    Recording: 

5. Eleni Panagiotou, (Knot polynomials of open and closed curves)

    Recording: 

6. Quenisha Baldwin, (The topological free energy of viral glycoproteins)

    Recording: